Browse Prior Art Database

Flexible Buffer Pooling With an SNA Receiving Station

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000043410D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-04
Document File: 2 page(s) / 53K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Freund, TJ: AUTHOR

Abstract

Allocation of unused storage into a buffer pool increases the throughput of a receiving station in a system network architecture (SNA) communication environment and eliminates the definition of an alternate communication configuration. The pacing mechanism of SNA controls receiving of data frames and signals readiness for accepting the next group as soon as the required number of buffers is available. At the same time the content of the remaining buffers is being processed so that an overlapping performance of data processing and data transmission is obtained. Within an SNA communications network various protocol mechanisms exist to regulate the flow of data. Control of the data link is defined by the Synchronous Data Link Control (SDLC) protocol.

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Flexible Buffer Pooling With an SNA Receiving Station

Allocation of unused storage into a buffer pool increases the throughput of a receiving station in a system network architecture (SNA) communication environment and eliminates the definition of an alternate communication configuration. The pacing mechanism of SNA controls receiving of data frames and signals readiness for accepting the next group as soon as the required number of buffers is available. At the same time the content of the remaining buffers is being processed so that an overlapping performance of data processing and data transmission is obtained. Within an SNA communications network various protocol mechanisms exist to regulate the flow of data. Control of the data link is defined by the Synchronous Data Link Control (SDLC) protocol. Within the SDLC protocol a structure is defined for link transmission that allows up to seven frames of data to be outstanding at a given point of time. The SNA station has the means to further control the rate at which it receives data via the pacing mechanism within the SNA protocol. The pacing mechanism reduces the number of data frames transmitted to match the existing buffer resource available at the receiver station and signals when a group of data frames can be accepted from the sender. Fig. 1 shows the communication code loaded into an allocated storage of variable length that might be larger than actually necessary. The loading might be performed in a receiv...