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Computer-Controlled Laser Engraving of Labels and Serial Numbers on Commercially Manufactured Products

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000043470D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-04
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Adair, W: AUTHOR [+7]

Abstract

This article describes a technique for utilizing computer-controlled laser engraving of serial numbers as well as other essential information (e.g., voltage, tolerances, and other specific information) onto the surfaces of commercially manufactured products. For many manufacturing firms, serial numbering and labeling of products is a corporate requirement that must be met. Typically, the serial number and other data are to be indelibly marked on a permanent member or area of the product. The serial numbers and possibly other marked data may have certain special significance, e.g., indicating country of origin or destination, etc. Traditional methods of marking a serial number and related data have involved hot-stamping such data onto the base or other appropriate area of the product, e.g., onto a serial number plate.

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Computer-Controlled Laser Engraving of Labels and Serial Numbers on Commercially Manufactured Products

This article describes a technique for utilizing computer-controlled laser engraving of serial numbers as well as other essential information (e.g., voltage, tolerances, and other specific information) onto the surfaces of commercially manufactured products. For many manufacturing firms, serial numbering and labeling of products is a corporate requirement that must be met. Typically, the serial number and other data are to be indelibly marked on a permanent member or area of the product. The serial numbers and possibly other marked data may have certain special significance, e.g., indicating country of origin or destination, etc. Traditional methods of marking a serial number and related data have involved hot-stamping such data onto the base or other appropriate area of the product, e.g., onto a serial number plate. Such a plate, if used, is then bonded onto the surface of the product itself. Frequently, labels may be preprinted with special data, such as information specifying the country of manufacture and/or country of destination. Such labels may then be selected, from order cards, for example, to correspond to the destination and/or origin countries. Additional data for the plate, such as voltage or other electrical specifications, must be selected (depending on power requirements) and attached to the product. Such a method is both time consuming and expen...