Browse Prior Art Database

Open/Short Testing

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000043536D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-04
Document File: 2 page(s) / 38K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Bayer, T: AUTHOR [+5]

Abstract

A method is described, by means of which multilayer conductor patterns are open/short tested, using a high-frequency high-voltage discharge and an image evaluator. This method permits fast testing, as the contacting otherwise required for measuring the electrical resistance of the conductors is eliminated. Fig. 1 is a sectional view of a substrate 1 with a multilayer conductor pattern 2, whose conductors are positioned on the top and the bottom side of substrate 1 as well as inside it. For testing, an electrode 3 of a unit 4, which is capable of generating a high-frequency high-voltage discharge, is applied in the vicinity of a contact pad 5 on the bottom side of substrate 1. A transparent grounded counter electrode 6 is arranged at a short distance from the contact pad 7 on the top side of substrate 1.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 86% of the total text.

Page 1 of 2

Open/Short Testing

A method is described, by means of which multilayer conductor patterns are open/short tested, using a high-frequency high-voltage discharge and an image evaluator. This method permits fast testing, as the contacting otherwise required for measuring the electrical resistance of the conductors is eliminated. Fig. 1 is a sectional view of a substrate 1 with a multilayer conductor pattern 2, whose conductors are positioned on the top and the bottom side of substrate 1 as well as inside it. For testing, an electrode 3 of a unit 4, which is capable of generating a high-frequency high-voltage discharge, is applied in the vicinity of a contact pad 5 on the bottom side of substrate 1. A transparent grounded counter electrode 6 is arranged at a short distance from the contact pad 7 on the top side of substrate 1. Ignition of the high-voltage discharge in a protective gas atmosphere at a contact pad on the bottom side causes each contact pad on the substrate surface, which is connected to the pad on the bottom side, to glow as a result of a locally confined discharge effect. Any flash-over of the discharge to adjacent contact pads is avoided by the small distance of counter electrode 6 from the pads. The high-voltage discharge positions on the substrate surface are fed to a computer-controlled image evaluator (not shown). The evaluator compares the desired positions with the actual positions. For interrupted conductors, there are no discharges, and for sh...