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Electrochemical Etching of Ruthenium Dioxide

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000043550D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-05
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Fey, EO: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

A description of the conditions under which pure, crystalline ruthenium dioxide (RuO2) is intentionally etched or completely decomposed involves alternating anodic and cathodic pulsing at 500 Hz in a .01 M KCl, 0.5 M KH2PO4 and pH 4.5 solution. Extensive changes in the topography of an initially smooth crystal face occur in a ten-minute period, using an initial current density of +/- 2.7 A/cm . Longer time spans and higher current densities lead to dissolution of significant quantities of the original crystal. Extensive etching is also observed in a .7 M KBr and 0.5 M KH2PO4 solution, with a current density of +/- 10 A/cm and a time period of 3 hours, by applying a waveform with a 0.5 ms anodic pulse followed by 2.25ms at ground, which is in turn followed by a 0.5ms cathodic pulse.

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Electrochemical Etching of Ruthenium Dioxide

A description of the conditions under which pure, crystalline ruthenium dioxide (RuO2) is intentionally etched or completely decomposed involves alternating anodic and cathodic pulsing at 500 Hz in a .01 M KCl, 0.5 M KH2PO4 and pH 4.5 solution. Extensive changes in the topography of an initially smooth crystal face occur in a ten-minute period, using an initial current density of +/- 2.7 A/cm . Longer time spans and higher current densities lead to dissolution of significant quantities of the original crystal. Extensive etching is also observed in a .7 M KBr and 0.5 M KH2PO4 solution, with a current density of +/- 10 A/cm and a time period of 3 hours, by applying a waveform with a 0.5 ms anodic pulse followed by
2.25ms at ground, which is in turn followed by a 0.5ms cathodic pulse. The local high pH produced during the cathodic pulse leads to more rapid dissolution of RuO2 in the form of Ru (VI) and Ru (VII) complexes. The presence of halides further increases the driving force for oxidation and dissolution.

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