Browse Prior Art Database

Sharing Data Sets Among Different Program Products That Share the Same Hard Disk

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000043568D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-05
Document File: 4 page(s) / 50K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Aiken, JA: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

The disclosed method for sharing common data sets among different programs sharing the same hard disk allows program products to differ, even as to operating systems, while minimizing the total space needed to store the total set of required data sets. The method also allows suitably-programmed applications to access a different hard file partition for the purpose of accessing and converting data for use by the current program product. In general, program products on small business/personal computer systems treat a hard disk similar to a very large diskette storage device. When a hard disk is partitioned among program products, each program product will normally have access only to its own partition, and system programming will normally prevent access to other partitions.

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Sharing Data Sets Among Different Program Products That Share the Same Hard Disk

The disclosed method for sharing common data sets among different programs sharing the same hard disk allows program products to differ, even as to operating systems, while minimizing the total space needed to store the total set of required data sets. The method also allows suitably-programmed applications to access a different hard file partition for the purpose of accessing and converting data for use by the current program product. In general, program products on small business/personal computer systems treat a hard disk similar to a very large diskette storage device. When a hard disk is partitioned among program products, each program product will normally have access only to its own partition, and system programming will normally prevent access to other partitions. The disclosed method modifies system programming for some program products so that other partitions may be accessed in a suitably- restricted manner. A small business/personal computer (PC) may support several applications, each tailored to the particular user set. PC applications require a general-purpose system which is very flexible, and which may be used under a large variety of situations. PC data sets, in particular, are designed to be able to support a large variety of business or personal applications. This means that the data set structure and data stream architectures should be very simple and extendable to many applications. Word processing (WP) applications present special performance and function requirements. To provide optimum function for a user, the system and application programming may be specifically tailored to the unique WP requirements. Data set structures and data stream architectures, in particular, may be very complex and designed specifically for WP needs. Other applications may present other specific requirements. For example, terminal emulation for attachment to host systems may have unique performance considerations that require unique modifications to the supporting operating system (OS). These modifications may improve performance, but they may also make the OS less flexible, or otherwise unsuitable for other applications. In general, applications working with a particular operating system will occupy the same partition on the hard file. Conversely, different operating systems normally will not run concurrently on small business/personal computer systems. These operating systems also often require different data set organizations and device handling. Therefore, different operating systems will normally occupy different partitions on the hard disk. However, there are often instances where the sharing of data among partitions would be very beneficial. For instance, the large number of characters to be displayed by Japanese computer systems (often in excess of 8,000) generally requires that the characters be kept in auxiliary storage, and not be hard-wire...