Browse Prior Art Database

Variable-Length Command Processing for an E-Beam Tool

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000043577D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-05
Document File: 2 page(s) / 48K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Landon, TV: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

In E-beam tools, the organization of data for pattern writing must conform to a data structure that is compatible with a pattern buffer. Very often, pattern writing involves repetitive elements which can be completely specified with less data than is presently required by using a data compaction system with variable-length commands. Disclosed herein is a variable-length command processing system that can recognize and process variable-length commands specifying pattern shapes and writing processes. Referring to Fig. 1, the variable-length command processing system comprises a command center 1 and three small buffers. In general, data is taken from input buffer 2 and stored in process buffer 3. After buffer 3 is full, command process center 1 strips blocks of variable length data from buffer 3.

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Variable-Length Command Processing for an E-Beam Tool

In E-beam tools, the organization of data for pattern writing must conform to a data structure that is compatible with a pattern buffer. Very often, pattern writing involves repetitive elements which can be completely specified with less data than is presently required by using a data compaction system with variable- length commands. Disclosed herein is a variable-length command processing system that can recognize and process variable-length commands specifying pattern shapes and writing processes. Referring to Fig. 1, the variable-length command processing system comprises a command center 1 and three small buffers. In general, data is taken from input buffer 2 and stored in process buffer
3. After buffer 3 is full, command process center 1 strips blocks of variable length data from buffer 3. This data is stored in command buffer 4. When processing variable-length commands, three command processing techniques are employed. The simplest of these involves processing commands which contain data fields. A second technique processes a block of data based on information contained in the command. The third technique involves processing various classes of commands based on present operating modes. Fig. 2 illustrates the configuration of command process center 1. Command processing is done by a Programmable Logic Array (PLA) 5 and associated control circuitry. From the eight-bit output of the PLA, 4 bits are used to...