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Non-Epoxide Containing Epoxy Resins for Rigid Disk Applications

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000043601D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-05
Document File: 2 page(s) / 40K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Balanson, RD: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Epoxy resins have been used for numerous applications from circuit boards (glass reinforced epoxys) to adhesives. The typical structure of an epoxy resin (the oligomer formed from bisphenol A and epichlorohydrin) is shown below. The terminal groups of this resin are EPOXIDE moieties. (Image Omitted) The chemical reactivity of the epoxide group is quite high when compared to the secondary alcohols found within the chain of the polymer. Depending upon the molecular weight of a particular epoxy resin, the number of epoxy groups per unit weight will vary, commonly expressed in terms of the Epoxide Equivalent Weight (EEW). It has been found that the epoxide group is unstable to conditions commonly encountered during pigment/polymer dispersion processing.

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Non-Epoxide Containing Epoxy Resins for Rigid Disk Applications

Epoxy resins have been used for numerous applications from circuit boards (glass reinforced epoxys) to adhesives. The typical structure of an epoxy resin (the oligomer formed from bisphenol A and epichlorohydrin) is shown below. The terminal groups of this resin are EPOXIDE moieties.

(Image Omitted)

The chemical reactivity of the epoxide group is quite high when compared to the secondary alcohols found within the chain of the polymer. Depending upon the molecular weight of a particular epoxy resin, the number of epoxy groups per unit weight will vary, commonly expressed in terms of the Epoxide Equivalent Weight (EEW). It has been found that the epoxide group is unstable to conditions commonly encountered during pigment/polymer dispersion processing. Analysis of the epoxy resin before and after processing indicated a significant loss of the epoxide end-group. For binder systems which are composed of resins with differing chemical properties, for example, surface active agents which are acidic in nature, we have found that the ingredients or impurities in the ingredients cause undesired polymerization of the epoxy resin forming gels within the coating. For systems in which crosslinking is accomplished by thermal cure, it has been found that the epoxide group of the epoxy resin is not required to effect complete cure and therefor could be removed from the polymer structure. For the two situations outlin...