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Water Treatment and Perchloroethylene Recovery System

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000043608D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-05
Document File: 3 page(s) / 37K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Singh, B: AUTHOR

Abstract

In conventional perchloroethylene recovery systems, activated carbon is employed at the final stage of the system to remove perchloroethylene from waste water before waste water is sent to industrial drain. Eventually, the activated carbon becomes saturated and must be replaced. It is a principal object of the invention disclosed herein to provide for the reconstitution of the activated carbon at the final stage of the system so that it can attain a longer useful life. The figure shows the improved perchloroethylene recovery system. Exhaust fumes from chemical hoods and other contaminated air sources are input from the duct 1 into the inlet of the activated carbon adsorption tower 2, and the fumes are drawn through the tower 2 by means of the exhaust fan 3.

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Water Treatment and Perchloroethylene Recovery System

In conventional perchloroethylene recovery systems, activated carbon is employed at the final stage of the system to remove perchloroethylene from waste water before waste water is sent to industrial drain. Eventually, the activated carbon becomes saturated and must be replaced. It is a principal object of the invention disclosed herein to provide for the reconstitution of the activated carbon at the final stage of the system so that it can attain a longer useful life. The figure shows the improved perchloroethylene recovery system. Exhaust fumes from chemical hoods and other contaminated air sources are input from the duct 1 into the inlet of the activated carbon adsorption tower 2, and the fumes are drawn through the tower 2 by means of the exhaust fan 3. The fumes which contain perchloroethylene contaminant are passed through the activated carbon in the tower 2, and the perchloroethylene molecules are adsorbed onto the surface of the activated carbon. This is called adsorption. After the activated carbon has become saturated in the tower 2, carbon needs to be regenerated. This is called desorption. The perchloroethylene is removed from the activated carbon in the tower 2 by pumping steam from the inlet 4 back up through the tower 2 and into the condenser 5. Compressed air can assist in the cleaning operation for the carbon in the tower 2. The perchloroethylene vapors and water from the steam condense in the condenser 5 and accumulate in the separator tower 6. Since the specific gravity of perchloroethylene is greater than that of water, the perchloroethylene accumulates at the bottom 7 of the tower 6 and is drawn off for purification before it can be revised in the process. Since the solubility of perchloroethylene in water has some small but finite value, a residual amount of perchloroethylene remains in the waste water contained in the separator tower 6. That waste water is drawn off through the outlet 8 into either the series-connected activated carbon adsorption towers 10 and 11 or, alternately, through the series-connected activated carbon adsorption towers 10' and 11'. The valve pair 9 and 9' control which of the pair of towers 10 and 11 or, alternately 10' and 11' will be used to remove the residual part of the perchloroethylene from the waste water in the outlet 8. After the waste water has been passed through the series-connected pair of towers 10 and 11, for example, the cleaned waste water passes through the valve 12 to the waste drain 13 for f...