Browse Prior Art Database

Tester Programmer

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000043639D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-05
Document File: 3 page(s) / 79K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Parilak, J: AUTHOR

Abstract

The existing technique for storing test patterns to be applied to memory products is to store the bytes of test data on unit record cards which are read by a conventional unit record card reader and the electrical output provided to the tester. This approach has a number of drawbacks, not the least of which has been the loss or mutilation of individual unit record cards, requiring the substitution of new unit record cards and the interruption of the transition from the tester testing a first product to the tester testing a second product. In addition, engineering changes to the test patterns stored on the unit record cards require retyping the entire 80 columns of test bits on a particular card in order to convert a single column to a revised format.

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Tester Programmer

The existing technique for storing test patterns to be applied to memory products is to store the bytes of test data on unit record cards which are read by a conventional unit record card reader and the electrical output provided to the tester. This approach has a number of drawbacks, not the least of which has been the loss or mutilation of individual unit record cards, requiring the substitution of new unit record cards and the interruption of the transition from the tester testing a first product to the tester testing a second product. In addition, engineering changes to the test patterns stored on the unit record cards require retyping the entire 80 columns of test bits on a particular card in order to convert a single column to a revised format. These and other problems are solved by the substitution of an erasable programmable read only memory (EPROM) storage medium for the unit record cards in order to enable the convenient and rapid changeover of the testing of one product for another product. A specific EPROM module will be associated with the particular product to be tested. The test pattern to be applied to the product is stored in digital form in the EPROM. The EPROM is then plugged into a receptacle on a printed circuit board, herein called a loader board, for a particular testing application. Fig. 1 illustrates the overall architecture for the invention. A tester 2 has an input bus 4 which is 12 bits wide. The input bus has been conventionally connected to the output of a card reader and conducts the 12 bits of information per column of the unit record card to the tester 2 to load a buffer within the tester with the test pattern desired to be applied to the product under test. As is shown in Fig. 1, a loader board 6 is substituted for the existing card reader and unit record cards. The loader board 6 includes card socket 8 into which an EPROM card 10 can be selectively plugged. Mounted on the card 10 is an EPROM module 12 in which is stored the test pattern associated with the product under test. A timing control 14, which can be, for example, a microprocessor, sequentially accesses the storage locations in the EPROM and the stored test pattern is output on the data bus 16 and output through the output port 18 over the bus 4 to the tester 2. An ad...