Browse Prior Art Database

Pneumatic Position Sensor

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000043652D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-05
Document File: 2 page(s) / 65K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Johnson, WC: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

This pneumatic position sensor can be made entirely from molded, non-metallic materials and is usable to indicate the position of a movable part in an environment, such as electromagnetic compatibility testing, in which no metallic parts or wires are permissible. Fig. 1 shows a top view of the sensor, while Figs. 2, 3 and 4 show sectional views. In Fig. 2, a piston B is movable within a cylindrical cavity of sensor body C. Body cap D, held in place by mounting screws E, retains piston B within the cylindrical cavity of body C. Three "O" ring seals separate and define three segments of piston B. Mounting holes G are provided in the base of sensor body C. In Fig. 4 air pressure is applied to port P1 which forces piston B to the upwardmost position shown.

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Pneumatic Position Sensor

This pneumatic position sensor can be made entirely from molded, non-metallic materials and is usable to indicate the position of a movable part in an environment, such as electromagnetic compatibility testing, in which no metallic parts or wires are permissible. Fig. 1 shows a top view of the sensor, while Figs. 2, 3 and 4 show sectional views. In Fig. 2, a piston B is movable within a cylindrical cavity of sensor body C. Body cap D, held in place by mounting screws E, retains piston B within the cylindrical cavity of body C. Three "O" ring seals separate and define three segments of piston B. Mounting holes G are provided in the base of sensor body C. In Fig. 4 air pressure is applied to port P1 which forces piston B to the upwardmost position shown. The positioning of "O" ring seal A2 determines the action which will take place when air is applied to either of the ports P2. In the position shown in Fig. 4 air is blocked. As a downward force is applied to piston B (air pressure is removed from P1 or the force exceeds the force by virtue of air pressure applied to piston B), piston B moves to the position shown in Fig. 2. This allows air to flow around piston B and out of port P2' to trigger a solenoid or similar device (not shown) to turn off air pressure. By using the configuration with the "O" ring A2 mounted as shown in Fig. 3 and applying air pressure at P1, piston B moves to the position shown in Fig. 4. Air is applied to one of t...