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Strain-Gauged Shaft Tape-Tension Transducer

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000043660D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-05
Document File: 2 page(s) / 47K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Guzman, AM: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Modern tape drive technology has created the need for a non-pneumatic tape-tension transducer. The design presented here represents a simple, low cost alternative to the current tension transducer art. The tension transducer consists of a roller which rotates on a cantilevered shaft which has strain gauges attached to opposite sides near the shaft's point of fixation (Fig. 1). When tension is applied to the tape, a bending moment is generated in the shaft. The resulting strain in the outer fibers of the shaft is linearly proportional to the magnitude of the tape tension. The strain gauges are oriented on the shaft such that one is loaded in pure tension and the other in pure compression.

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Strain-Gauged Shaft Tape-Tension Transducer

Modern tape drive technology has created the need for a non-pneumatic tape- tension transducer. The design presented here represents a simple, low cost alternative to the current tension transducer art. The tension transducer consists of a roller which rotates on a cantilevered shaft which has strain gauges attached to opposite sides near the shaft's point of fixation (Fig. 1). When tension is applied to the tape, a bending moment is generated in the shaft. The resulting strain in the outer fibers of the shaft is linearly proportional to the magnitude of the tape tension. The strain gauges are oriented on the shaft such that one is loaded in pure tension and the other in pure compression. The output of the transducer is received as a voltage due to a resistance differential imposed by the deformed strain gauges on a normally balanced wheatstone bridge. A notable feature of this design is the rectangular cross section of the gauged portion of the idler shaft (Fig. 2). This configuration tends to minimize shaft deflection in undesirable directions due to tape acceleration and roller friction. Good linearity, repeatability and high frequency response are assured by the minimal deflection (less than .001 inch) of the shaft. Semiconductor strain gauges (chosen for their characteristics of good linearity at low strain levels and excellent sensitivity) make acceptable output at such small deflections possible.

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