Browse Prior Art Database

Method for Making Task-To-Task Transitions in a Multi-Tasking Workstation

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000043683D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-05
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Berry, RE: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

By making all task-to-task transitions, for related tasks within an activity, in the activity's window, a user can more readily perform inter-task transitions and can maintain continuity of work being performed. Current multi-tasking computer keyboard/display workstations typically allow the user to perform each task in a window on the display screen. At the beginning of each task, the window must be allocated, and at the end of each task, the window is automatically deallocated. If the user is performing several tasks in sequence, the window size and location must be repeatedly respecified. A solution to the respecification problem is to maintain the window between related tasks within an activity and allow the user to specify the next task using the same window.

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Method for Making Task-To-Task Transitions in a Multi-Tasking Workstation

By making all task-to-task transitions, for related tasks within an activity, in the activity's window, a user can more readily perform inter-task transitions and can maintain continuity of work being performed. Current multi-tasking computer keyboard/display workstations typically allow the user to perform each task in a window on the display screen. At the beginning of each task, the window must be allocated, and at the end of each task, the window is automatically deallocated. If the user is performing several tasks in sequence, the window size and location must be repeatedly respecified. A solution to the respecification problem is to maintain the window between related tasks within an activity and allow the user to specify the next task using the same window. The window is allocated initially when the activity is created by the user. The user is allowed to control the size and location of the window to make it most convenient for the tasks being performed. At the end of each task, the window's current size and location are preserved and it is used to select the next task to be performed. The next task then runs in the same window. The user may therefore allocate a window once, adjust its size and location to be most convenient, and then have that window preserved across multiple-task transitions. The window also maintains continuity of the task sequence being performed.

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