Browse Prior Art Database

Energy Beam Enhanced MOCVD

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000043685D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-05
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Graf, V: AUTHOR

Abstract

A light or electron beam is used to selectively enhance the growth rate of epitaxial III/V semiconductor materials such as GaAs or GaAlAs. Metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) is known for its potential to grow epitaxial semiconducting layers in a product line environment. The substrates are RF heated to about 750"C, and for the Ga or Al sources TMG (trimethylgallium) or TMA (trimethylaluminum) is used. Irradiation of the substrate with an energy beam (photons or electrons) in the range of 0.05 to 1 J/cm2 suffices to enhance the epitaxial growth of the III/V material by a factor of up to 103 .By selectively illuminating the wafer, active materials can be grown to form a pattern determined by the illumination without any photoresist step, i.e., in a mask-less process.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 100% of the total text.

Page 1 of 1

Energy Beam Enhanced MOCVD

A light or electron beam is used to selectively enhance the growth rate of epitaxial III/V semiconductor materials such as GaAs or GaAlAs. Metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) is known for its potential to grow epitaxial semiconducting layers in a product line environment. The substrates are RF heated to about 750"C, and for the Ga or Al sources TMG (trimethylgallium) or TMA (trimethylaluminum) is used. Irradiation of the substrate with an energy beam (photons or electrons) in the range of 0.05 to 1 J/cm2 suffices to enhance the epitaxial growth of the III/V material by a factor of up to 103 .By selectively illuminating the wafer, active materials can be grown to form a pattern determined by the illumination without any photoresist step, i.e., in a mask-less process. If desirable, the wafer can be heated to a temperature just below the growth temperature of the semiconductor material so that only very little beam energy is required for the locally enhanced growth.

1