Browse Prior Art Database

Access Method for Dialog Manager (Monitor) in an Open System Interconnection Network

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000043710D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-05
Document File: 3 page(s) / 55K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Quigley, JJ: AUTHOR

Abstract

This invention relates to the invocation of a dialog manager in a layered communication peer-coupled processor network. An entity in a given layer communicates internally with an entity in the layer above it and with an entity in the layer below it. The following description relates to a method for establishing and maintaining a communication connection by end users to an open system without requiring protocol knowledge of the system. A construct denominated "primary partner" assists a processor in establishing this connection. User and Primary Partner Application Entities In Fig. 1A, rectangles represent application entities. An application entity communicates with another application entity by forming an association with the other application entity. Lines represent associations between pairs of application entities.

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Access Method for Dialog Manager (Monitor) in an Open System Interconnection Network

This invention relates to the invocation of a dialog manager in a layered communication peer-coupled processor network. An entity in a given layer communicates internally with an entity in the layer above it and with an entity in the layer below it. The following description relates to a method for establishing and maintaining a communication connection by end users to an open system without requiring protocol knowledge of the system. A construct denominated "primary partner" assists a processor in establishing this connection. User and Primary Partner Application Entities In Fig. 1A, rectangles represent application entities. An application entity communicates with another application entity by forming an association with the other application entity. Lines represent associations between pairs of application entities. An application entity can form a number of associations with different or the same application entities. In Fig. 1B, when an application entity is activated (i.e., made capable of participating in the open system interconnection (OSI) environment), it does not have any associations. The primary partner construct dictates that the local system environment should cause an association to occur between the newly activated application entity and the application entity that has been designated as its primary partner, as shown in Fig. 1C.

Fig. 1C also demonstrates that a primary partner may serve more than one end user application entity. No other associations may be made to or from the application entity until the primary partner indicates to the local system environment that it is OK to do so. State Diagram of One Application Entity In Fig. 2, the life of an application entity is divided into three states: (1) ENROLLED: The application entity is known to exist within the OSI environment. However, it may

not participate in the OSI environment. (2) ACTIVE: The application entity is now a part of the OSI environment. However, it may only

communicate with its primary partner application

entity, with which it has an association. (3) AVAILABLE: The application entity is now fully a part of the OSI environment. In Fig. 2, the events that cause an application entity to change states are shown as lines. The arrowhead indicates the state change direction. Each event and its state change have been assigned a number. They are discussed below:
(1) An "activate" request event is generated by the

local system environment. If the information

maintained about the application entity in the

local system indicates that its user must pass a

sign-on procedure, the new state now becomes

ACTIVE. Otherwise, the state is AVAILABLE. (2) The primary partner and the application entity have a dialog that determines the identity of the

end user of the application entity. Based on a

1

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