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Method for Managing Task-Related Resources in a Multi-Tasking Workstation

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000043713D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-05
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Berry, RE: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

By associating resources used by multiple tasks within an activity with the activity itself, a workstation can perform inter-task resource management for a user, and be made easier and more natural to use. Current multi-tasking keyboard/display computer workstations associate resources with each individual task and provide no assistance to help the user keep track of the resources from task to task. When multiple system tasks require the same resources, the user must respecify the needed resources at the beginning of each task. The resources are automatically deallocated at the end of each task. This allows gaps in resource allocation. The result is that a needed resource might be "stolen" by another parallel activity. A solution to the above problem is to associate resource allocation with the activity.

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Method for Managing Task-Related Resources in a Multi-Tasking Workstation

By associating resources used by multiple tasks within an activity with the activity itself, a workstation can perform inter-task resource management for a user, and be made easier and more natural to use. Current multi-tasking keyboard/display computer workstations associate resources with each individual task and provide no assistance to help the user keep track of the resources from task to task. When multiple system tasks require the same resources, the user must respecify the needed resources at the beginning of each task. The resources are automatically deallocated at the end of each task. This allows gaps in resource allocation. The result is that a needed resource might be "stolen" by another parallel activity. A solution to the above problem is to associate resource allocation with the activity. Resources can then be acquired once and can be passed from task to task within the activity. A list of all currently allocated resources can be displayed with a command to the activity manager. All resources required to complete an activity can then be held as long as needed. The user may therefore allocate all of the resources needed to complete an activity when it is initially created, thereby assuring that the activity can be completed without contention from other activities. Resources can be passed from task to task without requiring that they be respecified by the user. Gaps in resour...