Browse Prior Art Database

Method for User Specification of Return Points in a Dialogue

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000043717D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-05
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Berry, RE: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

By allowing a user to specify return points in a programming user-system dialogue, flexibility, productivity and ease of use are improved. Current systems typically permit various forms of "return" functions allowing the user to "back up" to previous points in the dialogue. These points are determined by the system/application designer and may or may not be the most appropriate for each user in each situation. Often there are points to which the user would like to return, but is not able to because of the program design. The user must then return to a point further back or even start over again, repeating many steps already completed. A solution to the above problem is to allow the user to "mark" current points of return.

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Method for User Specification of Return Points in a Dialogue

By allowing a user to specify return points in a programming user-system dialogue, flexibility, productivity and ease of use are improved. Current systems typically permit various forms of "return" functions allowing the user to "back up" to previous points in the dialogue. These points are determined by the system/application designer and may or may not be the most appropriate for each user in each situation. Often there are points to which the user would like to return, but is not able to because of the program design. The user must then return to a point further back or even start over again, repeating many steps already completed. A solution to the above problem is to allow the user to "mark" current points of return. Upon subsequent use of a "return command", the user's points would be available as well as those specified by the programmer. As such, users can tailor dialogues to be most efficient for their current needs, allowing often used segments to be repeated, and providing the most appropriate return points for typical errors. The system will be easier to use and more productive by not requiring the user to repeat steps needlessly.

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