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Computer-Assisted, Solar-Radiation-Dependent Internal Temperature Control for Buildings

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000043718D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-05
Document File: 2 page(s) / 30K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Heinrich, HJ: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

A heating system, operating with warm water, produces a particular average internal temperature if a particular initial water temperature is set on a motor-driven mixing valve (for warm and cold water). The influence of solar radiation on the internal temperature control is taken into account in that in the relation WT = V $ Wt (WT = changing the initial temperature by setting the mixing valve v = amplification factor Wt = operating time of mixing valve motor) the amplification factor is kept variable as a function of solar radiation. As for internal temperature control, the initial water temperature is considerably increased in the starting phase of the heating system, and the desired internal temperature is obtained only after some time, the heating system being subject to initial overshooting.

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Computer-Assisted, Solar-Radiation-Dependent Internal Temperature Control for Buildings

A heating system, operating with warm water, produces a particular average internal temperature if a particular initial water temperature is set on a motor-driven mixing valve (for warm and cold water). The influence of solar radiation on the internal temperature control is taken into account in that in the relation WT = V $ Wt (WT = changing the initial temperature by setting

the mixing valve

v = amplification factor

Wt = operating time of mixing valve motor) the amplification factor is kept variable as a function of solar radiation. As for internal temperature control, the initial water temperature is considerably increased in the starting phase of the heating system, and the desired internal temperature is obtained only after some time, the heating system being subject to initial overshooting. This can be eliminated or minimized by using mathematical filters and predetermining an upper and a lower temperature boundary, in order to prevent overheating and maintain the heat convection in the floor region of rooms. The capacity of up-to-date computers, which have short computing times and large storages, is such that heating curves (initial temperature as a function of the external temperature, with the internal temperature being a parameter), as illustrated in the figure, may be recorded for longer periods, depending upon the time of year and day, the weather, cloud condition...