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Method for Organizing User Tasks in a Multi-Tasking Workstation

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000043723D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-05
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Berry, RE: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

By organizing related tasks into activities, a user can more naturally and efficiently manage work performed by a multi-tasking workstation. Current multi-tasking computer keyboard/display workstations allow a user to perform multiple tasks concurrently, but provide no assistance to the user in keeping track of the tasks. When multiple system tasks are required to complete a user task, the user must remember which system task is being performed for each user task. The user must also remember which user tasks are incomplete. A solution to the above problems is to (1) define an organization of system tasks related to a single user task as an activity, and (2) provide an activity manager task to allow the user to create and name activities which represent user tasks.

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Method for Organizing User Tasks in a Multi-Tasking Workstation

By organizing related tasks into activities, a user can more naturally and efficiently manage work performed by a multi-tasking workstation. Current multi- tasking computer keyboard/display workstations allow a user to perform multiple tasks concurrently, but provide no assistance to the user in keeping track of the tasks. When multiple system tasks are required to complete a user task, the user must remember which system task is being performed for each user task. The user must also remember which user tasks are incomplete. A solution to the above problems is to (1) define an organization of system tasks related to a single user task as an activity, and (2) provide an activity manager task to allow the user to create and name activities which represent user tasks. Activity names are displayed with each activity and a list of the activities currently running can be displayed with a command to the activity manager. All system tasks required to complete user tasks are then performed as part of named activities. The user may therefore create activities which directly parallel the user tasks to be performed. Thus, it will be easier to organize work to be performed on the workstation. In addition activities can be given meaningful names which identify the user tasks being performed and serve as reminders for user tasks that are not yet complete. Further, continuity will be provided, since the activity exi...