Browse Prior Art Database

Computer-Controlled Cable Harness Manufacturing Using a Robot

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000043735D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-05
Document File: 3 page(s) / 49K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

App, RH: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

There are a number of tasks which must be performed to provide automated cable harnessing. There must be board preparation, wire laying, bundling of wires, marking of wires, stripping and terminating the leads, and testing. The various design and manufacturing data can be entered in a CADAM (computer aided design and manufacture) file and the information as to wire routing and data, etc., can be programmed to control the robot. Referring to Fig. 1, there is shown a cable harnessing system including a box frame type robot having X, Y and Z arm movement. The gripper 10 is shown at the end of the Z arm 12 axis and serves to pick up and hold the various tools required for the cable harnessing application.

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Computer-Controlled Cable Harness Manufacturing Using a Robot

There are a number of tasks which must be performed to provide automated cable harnessing. There must be board preparation, wire laying, bundling of wires, marking of wires, stripping and terminating the leads, and testing. The various design and manufacturing data can be entered in a CADAM (computer aided design and manufacture) file and the information as to wire routing and data, etc., can be programmed to control the robot. Referring to Fig. 1, there is shown a cable harnessing system including a box frame type robot having X, Y and Z arm movement. The gripper 10 is shown at the end of the Z arm 12 axis and serves to pick up and hold the various tools required for the cable harnessing application. In conjunction with the robot, there is a connector housing station 14 by means of which the connectors for the ends of the cables are made available to the robot. The actual connection of the connectors to the individual wires of the cable are made in the connector stations 18, three of which are shown. A further station 20, which performs wire feed and stripping of the ends of the wires for connector application, is also provided. The connector board 22, to which the cable is to be routed and connected, is shown within the robot workspace. In operation, a wire feed position module 24, shown in Figs. 2a, 2b and 2c, is picked up by the robot at a docking station. The gripper has elements which fit into the gripper-locating holes 26, shown in Figs. 2a and 2b. The wire 28 (Fig. 2c) is fed from the wire feed station into the wire feed positioner 24 in sufficient length for the robot to move it to the strip portion of the station where the insulation at the ends of the wires is stripped. As can be seen, the wire 28 is fed through the feed positioner 24 in either direction depending on the direction of the stepping motor 30 control thereof. The initial wire end is terminated and the wire is fed out of the wire feeder 20 and forms a loop, with the one end which is stripped and terminated being held by the wire feed positioner 24 and the other end still being held by the wire feed stat...