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Elevated Temperature Ion Implantation

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000043745D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-05
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Uyer, S: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

This article relates generally to the ion implantation of dopants and more particularly to ion implantation at high substrate temperatures to activate the implanted dopants and to minimize substrate damage which occurs during ion implantation. Shallow junction technology is a critical area in scaled semiconductor devices. Usually these junctions are formed by ion implantation at fairly low ion energies (typically several KeV) which implants the ions at very shallow depths. Unfortunately, very few of these ions are electrically active and a high temperature activation anneal (above 900ŒC) is required to activate the implanted dose. This step had deleterious effects on the junction profile in that the dopant diffuses considerably during annealing.

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Elevated Temperature Ion Implantation

This article relates generally to the ion implantation of dopants and more particularly to ion implantation at high substrate temperatures to activate the implanted dopants and to minimize substrate damage which occurs during ion implantation. Shallow junction technology is a critical area in scaled semiconductor devices. Usually these junctions are formed by ion implantation at fairly low ion energies (typically several KeV) which implants the ions at very shallow depths. Unfortunately, very few of these ions are electrically active and a high temperature activation anneal (above 900OEC) is required to activate the implanted dose. This step had deleterious effects on the junction profile in that the dopant diffuses considerably during annealing. The final junction depth is thus dictated by the thermal cycle of the annealing step. Annealing also serves to remove ion implantation. It has been found in using Si Ion Beam Deposition (a modified version of molecular beam epitaxy) that ion implants are almost 100% active when the substrate temperatures are held at 750OEC. Because the resulting film quality is very good, minimal damage during implantation is believed to have occurred. Consequently, ion implantation should be done with the substrate at a temperature of about 700OEC which is still low enough to preclude any dopant smearing effects. As a result, the implant profile will be different at these temperatures and will have...