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High Current Washer

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000043746D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-05
Document File: 2 page(s) / 42K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Hill, PW: AUTHOR

Abstract

This article describes the use of a special washer to increase the current-carrying capacity of an electrical contact between a conductive film and a mechanical connector element connected to other current-carrying circuits. The washer is particularly useful in applications where painted, sprayed or vapor-deposited conductive films are used for decorative or RFI shielding purposes. To accomplish the increase in current-carrying capacity, a washer 1 with a unique geometric shape, as shown in Fig. 1, is mechanically attached to a current carrying device 2, such as a screw, bolt, etc., as shown in Fig. 3. A conductive film 5 has been previously applied to the upper surface of the board 6. The unique geometric shape of the washer with the array of fingers 3 and 4, as shown in Fig.

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High Current Washer

This article describes the use of a special washer to increase the current- carrying capacity of an electrical contact between a conductive film and a mechanical connector element connected to other current-carrying circuits. The washer is particularly useful in applications where painted, sprayed or vapor- deposited conductive films are used for decorative or RFI shielding purposes. To accomplish the increase in current-carrying capacity, a washer 1 with a unique geometric shape, as shown in Fig. 1, is mechanically attached to a current carrying device 2, such as a screw, bolt, etc., as shown in Fig. 3. A conductive film 5 has been previously applied to the upper surface of the board 6. The unique geometric shape of the washer with the array of fingers 3 and 4, as shown in Fig. 1, provides a uniform dispersion of current such that the current densities at the points of contact with the film are within the non-destructive current-carrying capacities of the film. The number of fingers, the radius of the outer fingers 3 and the inner fingers 4 are determined so that the contact area "A" (Fig. 2) and the current to be passed are within the continuous current- carrying capacity of the conductive film. When the washer is drawn down by the screw or bolt, the fingers make firm pressure contact with the film, enabling the current to be distributed over the entire circular area "A". This is several times the area "B" when a plain circular washer is use...