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Audible Cursor Positioning and Pixel Status Identification Mechanism

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000043761D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-05
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Drumm, AD: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

An audible cursor positioning and pixel (picture element) status identification mechanism helps an interactive computer graphics system user to precisely locate graphic data by using aural feedback to enhance visual feedback. When using a graphics display device in a graphics entry system, it is often necessary to precisely locate a line or other object being displayed. The resolution of the display device combined with the pixel size and the visual interface to the human eye make locating an object difficult especially on a low resolution graphics device. To improve the pixel identification process, aural feedback is used to enhance the already present visual feedback. As the cursor is stepped across the screen, an audible click is generated which varies in tone corresponding to the current status of each pixel encountered.

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Audible Cursor Positioning and Pixel Status Identification Mechanism

An audible cursor positioning and pixel (picture element) status identification mechanism helps an interactive computer graphics system user to precisely locate graphic data by using aural feedback to enhance visual feedback. When using a graphics display device in a graphics entry system, it is often necessary to precisely locate a line or other object being displayed. The resolution of the display device combined with the pixel size and the visual interface to the human eye make locating an object difficult especially on a low resolution graphics device. To improve the pixel identification process, aural feedback is used to enhance the already present visual feedback. As the cursor is stepped across the screen, an audible click is generated which varies in tone corresponding to the current status of each pixel encountered. With this combination of audible and visual cursor feedback, it becomes a simple task to precisely identify the desired line by noting the change in tone as the cursor moves. For color display applications, each color is represented by a distinct tone so any single pixel may be distinguished from the surrounding pixels of a different color. This arrangement differs from other aural feedback systems in that the feedback involves displayed data at the cursor location rather than the cursor location itself. Besides aiding typical users, this mechanism is especially helpful for...