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Controlling Metal Dispersion Content in Fluorocarbon Polymer Film Matrices

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000043768D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-05
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Kay, E: AUTHOR

Abstract

In plasma depositing of metal into a polymer, small increases in substrate temperature will dramatically slow down the rate of polymer formation whereas the simultaneous metal deposition rate into the polymer matrix is unaffected for the same temperature excursion. As a result, the metal-to-polymer ratio in the film can be changed, keeping everything else constant in the plasma. This is considered a great advantage considering the complexity in the subsequent plasma chemistry that would result from most other plasma parameter changes. The table below reports actual data of the ratio of polymer-to-metal as determined by E.S.C.A. analysis. The particular example chosen to validate the above claim is gold metal clusters dispersed in the polymer matrix. In this case the film analysis is straightforward since the E.S.C.A.

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Controlling Metal Dispersion Content in Fluorocarbon Polymer Film Matrices

In plasma depositing of metal into a polymer, small increases in substrate temperature will dramatically slow down the rate of polymer formation whereas the simultaneous metal deposition rate into the polymer matrix is unaffected for the same temperature excursion. As a result, the metal-to-polymer ratio in the film can be changed, keeping everything else constant in the plasma. This is considered a great advantage considering the complexity in the subsequent plasma chemistry that would result from most other plasma parameter changes. The table below reports actual data of the ratio of polymer-to-metal as determined by E.S.C.A. analysis. The particular example chosen to validate the above claim is gold metal clusters dispersed in the polymer matrix. In this case the film analysis is straightforward since the E.S.C.A. F1s signal becomes a quantitative measure of the polymer content in the film, since Au does not bond with fluorine. Likewise, the Au signal is a unique measure of the metallic Au trapped in this chemically inert cross-linked TEFLON*-like matrix. All experiments reported here were performed under exactly the same discharge conditions except for the substrate temperature. The discharge conditions can best be characterized by referring to the ratio of key species arriving at the substrate, i.e., CF2* radicals and Au* atoms. These can readily be monitored by optical emission spect...