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Browse Prior Art Database

High Contrast Microscope Reticle

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000043850D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-05
Document File: 2 page(s) / 37K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Eckert, B: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

The new reticle pattern described herein compensates for viewing losses inherent in TV systems. The arrangement further provides a more precise method of positioning. When viewing the part to be inspected through the gage microscope, a cross-hair reticle with .0001" wide lines can be viewed very nicely. However, when viewing the same field with a closed-circuit television system, the .0001 wide cross-hair cannot be resolved on the viewing monitor due to the inherent losses from the monitor screen dot pattern. The present arrangement solves this problem by using a staggered block pattern 10 instead of a cross-hair in the gage microscope. The technique is to provide a large-black rectangular (.005" x .010") pattern 10. The size of these blocks 12 is large enough so they can be easily viewed on the television monitor.

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High Contrast Microscope Reticle

The new reticle pattern described herein compensates for viewing losses inherent in TV systems. The arrangement further provides a more precise method of positioning. When viewing the part to be inspected through the gage microscope, a cross-hair reticle with .0001" wide lines can be viewed very nicely. However, when viewing the same field with a closed-circuit television system, the
.0001 wide cross-hair cannot be resolved on the viewing monitor due to the inherent losses from the monitor screen dot pattern. The present arrangement solves this problem by using a staggered block pattern 10 instead of a cross-hair in the gage microscope. The technique is to provide a large-black rectangular
(.005" x .010") pattern 10. The size of these blocks 12 is large enough so they can be easily viewed on the television monitor. To get precise positioning of the part edge being inspected, a staggered block pattern is laid out. The inside edges 14 of the blocks are precisely in line with each other and provide a very precise method of positioning an edge of a part because the part edge can be viewed from two directions, thereby making minute errors stand out. The cross- hair technique introduces positioning errors within the line width, while aligning to the end of a block eliminates this error. The arrangement is most useful in applications where it is needed to null the reticle reference lines to an edge of a part under inspection and record t...