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Thermoplastic Rubber Tie Wraps for Coaxial Cables

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000043863D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-05
Document File: 2 page(s) / 28K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Aliotta, CF: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Molded thermoplastic soft rubber tie wraps in various designs prevent damage to coaxial cables that are sensitive to binding pressures. The material for these wraps can be molded into a strap form to bind coaxial cables together without affecting their critical wire dimensions. It maintains a tacky quality that resists lateral slippage when secured around a cable, stretches to avoid excessive tightening, and automatically releases under excessive pressure. Three designs for this tie wrap are proposed. Fig. 1 shows a wrap with a notched or sawtooth design that can be fitted through the small hole in the round end and pulled through, securing the cable. The notches engage against the side wall of the hole, acting as a resistance to prevent slippage.

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Thermoplastic Rubber Tie Wraps for Coaxial Cables

Molded thermoplastic soft rubber tie wraps in various designs prevent damage to coaxial cables that are sensitive to binding pressures. The material for these wraps can be molded into a strap form to bind coaxial cables together without affecting their critical wire dimensions. It maintains a tacky quality that resists lateral slippage when secured around a cable, stretches to avoid excessive tightening, and automatically releases under excessive pressure. Three designs for this tie wrap are proposed. Fig. 1 shows a wrap with a notched or sawtooth design that can be fitted through the small hole in the round end and pulled through, securing the cable. The notches engage against the side wall of the hole, acting as a resistance to prevent slippage. If the tension is too tight, the elasticity will force the tension to be relieved automatically by slipping to the next notch. The resistance desired can be determined by the depth or regularity of the notches. Fig. 2 shows a wrap designed with hemispherical bumps molded on the stem of the tie wrap that can be pushed through a slotted hole at the other end. When pulled against the cables, the resistance of the flap against the bumps will act as a stop and be used to keep the tie at a desired pressure. If pulled too tight, it automatically seeks its own pressure by expanding along the bumps. Fig. 3 shows a strap containing holes and buttons that can be forced into the hol...