Browse Prior Art Database

OFFSET CROSS Cursor Step Key

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000043890D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-05
Document File: 2 page(s) / 23K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Mack, RL: AUTHOR

Abstract

The OFFSET CROSS cursor step key arrangement is a new design that enhances cursoring performance because of its compatibility with the use of human hands and spatial mnemonicity. Cursor step keys are used to move a cursor on a cathode ray tube, in four directions: up, down, right and left. The arrangement of these keys should make ease of movement and spatial mnemonicity compatible. Fig. 1 is designed primarily for ease of movement, and the geometric configuration of Fig. 2 enhances mnemonicity. But the offset cross design (Fig. 3) combines both of these considerations. The up key is topmost and to the right, the down key is at the bottom to the left, the left and right keys are left and right, respectively. Unlike Fig. 1, the OFFSET CROSS does not require the fingers to twist in order to reach the up and down keys.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 96% of the total text.

Page 1 of 2

OFFSET CROSS Cursor Step Key

The OFFSET CROSS cursor step key arrangement is a new design that enhances cursoring performance because of its compatibility with the use of human hands and spatial mnemonicity. Cursor step keys are used to move a cursor on a cathode ray tube, in four directions: up, down, right and left. The arrangement of these keys should make ease of movement and spatial mnemonicity compatible. Fig. 1 is designed primarily for ease of movement, and the geometric configuration of Fig. 2 enhances mnemonicity. But the offset cross design (Fig. 3) combines both of these considerations. The up key is topmost and to the right, the down key is at the bottom to the left, the left and right keys are left and right, respectively. Unlike Fig. 1, the OFFSET CROSS does not require the fingers to twist in order to reach the up and down keys. The first two fingers (beginning with the index finger) need make only small movements off the horizontal (left and right) keys in order to reach their respective up and down keys. The right and left keys are adjacent to each other (rather than separated as in Fig. 2). This minimizes right and left finger movements for one of the most frequent finger alternations. Human factors research has demonstrated that users spend a large amount of time cursoring. Any reduction in time or effort for using cursor keys, however small, can be expected to significantly improve overall performance using a computer system.

1

Page 2 of 2

2

...