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Photo-Thermally Induced Noble-Metal Coating Formed on Ceramics

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000043898D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-05
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Tam, AC: AUTHOR

Abstract

A new way of bonding ceramics onto other parts relies on the effect of photo-thermal induced noble-metal bonding onto ceramics, as illustrated in the following example. A gold paste containing about 80% gold, and the rest being base metal, organic binder and solvent, is first suitably diluted in tetrahydrofuran to provide the desired viscosity; it is then "painted" onto a ceramic substrate, and the painted area is then exposed to a focused CO2 laser beam of 2-watt power that is rapidly scanned over the surface. The scan rate is about 5" per second with the laser beam being focused to a 50-micron spot, although many other scan rates and beam sizes are possible. Such a scanning produces a strongly adhering gold deposit onto the substrate over the area scanned.

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Photo-Thermally Induced Noble-Metal Coating Formed on Ceramics

A new way of bonding ceramics onto other parts relies on the effect of photo- thermal induced noble-metal bonding onto ceramics, as illustrated in the following example. A gold paste containing about 80% gold, and the rest being base metal, organic binder and solvent, is first suitably diluted in tetrahydrofuran to provide the desired viscosity; it is then "painted" onto a ceramic substrate, and the painted area is then exposed to a focused CO2 laser beam of 2-watt power that is rapidly scanned over the surface. The scan rate is about 5" per second with the laser beam being focused to a 50-micron spot, although many other scan rates and beam sizes are possible. Such a scanning produces a strongly adhering gold deposit onto the substrate over the area scanned. The gold deposit adheres very well, and cannot be removed from the ceramic substrate by Scotch Tape or by a tweezer. The deposition is not universally possible for all substrates, and it seems to rely on some subtle properties of the substrate like its composition and its thermal conductivity. Although the deposition works remarkably well for Al2O3-based ceramics, it does not work well for SiO2-based glasses like fused quartz.

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