Browse Prior Art Database

Computer Power Control Using a Single-Chip Microcomputer

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000043908D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-05
Document File: 2 page(s) / 62K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

De Mara, F: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

A single-chip microcomputer, packaged on a single standard logic card, using a single card location in the system, provides a high density of circuit function. This allows the entire power sequencer function to be accomplished more efficiently with an improvement in flexibility and reliability at a lower cost than previous methods used for the control power function. The single chip can store up to 1024 bytes of microcode. Its input bus is expanded by using a multiplexer module 12 located on the card that allows up to 32 bits of data to be read into the internal registers of the controller. The microcode is tailored for the particular sequencing required. When its development is completed, it is permanently stored within the chip's internal memory, the read-only memory (ROM).

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Computer Power Control Using a Single-Chip Microcomputer

A single-chip microcomputer, packaged on a single standard logic card, using a single card location in the system, provides a high density of circuit function. This allows the entire power sequencer function to be accomplished more efficiently with an improvement in flexibility and reliability at a lower cost than previous methods used for the control power function. The single chip can store up to 1024 bytes of microcode. Its input bus is expanded by using a multiplexer module 12 located on the card that allows up to 32 bits of data to be read into the internal registers of the controller. The microcode is tailored for the particular sequencing required. When its development is completed, it is permanently stored within the chip's internal memory, the read-only memory (ROM). The card also contains comparator circuitry 11 used to generate the required signal levels feeding into the multiplexer module 12. Port selection is done under control of the microcomputer microcode. Threshold levels required for the voltage comparators and regulated supply voltages for the comparators are provided by an on-card voltage regulator.

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