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Batch Processing Control

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000043951D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-05
Document File: 2 page(s) / 45K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Goodrich, JL: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Batch integrity must be maintained throughout the disk manufacturing line. By definition a batch is the quantity of disks contained in an autostacker. Normally, disks go from an input autostacker to an output autostacker so batch integrity is self-maintained. But, during chemical treatment, an operator transfers disks from autostackers into baskets, and following clean line process, a robot loads the disks back into an autostacker. It is necessary that the control system know which baskets are associated with a batch. Counting parts fails because the size of the batch varies. As shown in the figures, batch information is provided as the operator manually loads each basket. The stationary handle 5 of each basket 6 has two movable balls 7 and 8 mounted thereon. By moving these balls to the inside (Fig. 3) or outside (Fig.

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Batch Processing Control

Batch integrity must be maintained throughout the disk manufacturing line. By definition a batch is the quantity of disks contained in an autostacker. Normally, disks go from an input autostacker to an output autostacker so batch integrity is self-maintained. But, during chemical treatment, an operator transfers disks from autostackers into baskets, and following clean line process, a robot loads the disks back into an autostacker. It is necessary that the control system know which baskets are associated with a batch. Counting parts fails because the size of the batch varies. As shown in the figures, batch information is provided as the operator manually loads each basket. The stationary handle 5 of each basket 6 has two movable balls 7 and 8 mounted thereon. By moving these balls to the inside (Fig. 3) or outside (Fig. 1) of the handle, the operator codes the status of the basket, as shown in the figures. Two balls on the outside, as shown in Fig. 1, signal the first basket in a batch. Zero balls at the outside, as illustrated in Fig. 3, indicate a middle basket in the batch. One ball 8 on the outside as shown in Fig. 2, flags the last basket in the batch. The basket is loaded before entering the first station of the clean line. Thereafter, the basket travels along a conveyer to an unload area where a robot places the disks in an autostacker. Three optical proximity sensors 10, 11 and 12 are positioned at the unload area. Sensor 10 detec...