Browse Prior Art Database

Method of Testing the Adhesion of Lithographic Materials

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000043968D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-05
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Bergendahl, AS: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

Almost all very large-scale integration fabrication employs photolithography, in which various organic polymers (resists) are used as masking materials in selective etching. Adhesion between resists and substrate materials is one of the most serious problems in resist patterning simply because of the many process variables involved. This article concerns the development of a quantitative test for photoresist adhesion, one that can accurately evaluate an "in situ" lithographic process, and is easily adapted to routine adhesion testing in a manufacturing situation.

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Method of Testing the Adhesion of Lithographic Materials

Almost all very large-scale integration fabrication employs photolithography, in which various organic polymers (resists) are used as masking materials in selective etching. Adhesion between resists and substrate materials is one of the most serious problems in resist patterning simply because of the many process variables involved. This article concerns the development of a quantitative test for photoresist adhesion, one that can accurately evaluate an "in situ" lithographic process, and is easily adapted to routine adhesion testing in a manufacturing situation. The disclosed solution to testing resists for adhesion properties consists of evaluating equally sized dots (islands), after a controlled over-development (stress), and relating the number remaining attached to the wafer (% of initial dot population) to those properties. This can be done quickly and accurately with an image analyzing tool, such as the Hammamatsu. The disclosed process employs a mask which normally produces a pattern of 2.5 x
2.5 mm nominal size dots on a wafer by optical exposure. The resist under evaluation is stressed by over-development, controlled by laser end-point detection, so as to obtain a pattern of only 1 x 1 mm dots on the wafer. A count is made of the total number of such dots remaining in the pattern, giving a percentage figure which relates directly to the resist adhesion properties. When employing this test, any pro...