Browse Prior Art Database

Pin Repair Using Ultrasonic Aluminum Bonding

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000044013D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-05
Document File: 2 page(s) / 63K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Perry, CH: AUTHOR

Abstract

This article describes a process for repairing pulled ceramic pin sites on multilayer ceramic substrates having ceramic pull-out due to pin repair damage. The disclosed process, which is fast and reliable, permits the reclamation of such substrates under room temperature conditions with no ceramic damage. A certain percentage of production TCM substrates is discarded because of ceramic pull-out under an I/O (input/output) pad. A typical cross-section of such a substrate in the vicinity of the damaged I/O pad (including vias) is shown in Fig. 1. Aluminum metal will directly bond to a variety of ceramic surfaces with adhesion strengths approaching 10 kpsi in tension. Such bonds can be made at room temperature using an ultrasonic compression mechanism.

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Pin Repair Using Ultrasonic Aluminum Bonding

This article describes a process for repairing pulled ceramic pin sites on multilayer ceramic substrates having ceramic pull-out due to pin repair damage. The disclosed process, which is fast and reliable, permits the reclamation of such substrates under room temperature conditions with no ceramic damage. A certain percentage of production TCM substrates is discarded because of ceramic pull-out under an I/O (input/output) pad. A typical cross-section of such a substrate in the vicinity of the damaged I/O pad (including vias) is shown in Fig.
1. Aluminum metal will directly bond to a variety of ceramic surfaces with adhesion strengths approaching 10 kpsi in tension. Such bonds can be made at room temperature using an ultrasonic compression mechanism. The damaged area of the substrate is first dressed by one or more of the means common to the art, giving the result shown in Fig. 2. The repair pin shank length is next adjusted for the depth of the dressed area, and aluminum metal is evaporated into the repair site. The pin is ultrasonically bonded to the dressed I/O pad location, as shown in Fig. 3, the aluminum bond providing both a mechanical attachment to the substrate and a high conductivity path from the vias to the repair pin.

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