Browse Prior Art Database

Fault-Tolerant Transmission Line Noise/Fault Detector

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000044033D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-05
Document File: 2 page(s) / 39K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Balliet, L: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

This article describes a fault-tolerant transmission line noise/fault detector which detects abnormal noise or open/short circuit faults on a balanced transmission line by detecting line imbalance with a toroidal core transformer. Balanced transmission lines, such as twisted shielded pairs, are often used to interconnect processor equipment via data bus or point-to-point connection. Faults that degrade balance can make the system susceptible to noise that degrades performance. Malfunctions often appear as intermittent failures. Consequently, these faults are difficult to identify and isolate to the transmission line. A conventional method of detecting cable faults utilizes two receivers and a comparator that detect input signals relative to a system ground and flags when they do not compare.

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Fault-Tolerant Transmission Line Noise/Fault Detector

This article describes a fault-tolerant transmission line noise/fault detector which detects abnormal noise or open/short circuit faults on a balanced transmission line by detecting line imbalance with a toroidal core transformer. Balanced transmission lines, such as twisted shielded pairs, are often used to interconnect processor equipment via data bus or point-to-point connection. Faults that degrade balance can make the system susceptible to noise that degrades performance. Malfunctions often appear as intermittent failures. Consequently, these faults are difficult to identify and isolate to the transmission line. A conventional method of detecting cable faults utilizes two receivers and a comparator that detect input signals relative to a system ground and flags when they do not compare. For example, if one of the input wires is grounded, the comparator would provide a "no compare" output. This approach has several disadvantages. Firstly, faults in the test circuit can load or otherwise change system performance, and secondly, a precision ground reference is necessary. The detector circuit disclosed herein eliminates these disadvantages. A typical transmission system would include transmitters T and receiver R, shown in broken lines in the drawing. The fault-tolerant noise/fault detector disclosed herein consists of several components including a torroidal core transformer 1 that has the transmission line passing through it and a conventional threshold receiver 2 connected to its secondary winding.

The coupling technique is similar to that disclosed in [*] but differs in the way the transmission line wires pass through the core.

A load resister 3 develops the signal for the input of receiver 2 and a field-e...