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Technique for Generating Dynamic Stress Patterns

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000044041D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-05
Document File: 2 page(s) / 48K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Leith, VS: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

A technique is described whereby test vectors are used for testing reliability and operational characteristics and for quickly creating dynamic stress tests for complex very large-scale integrated (VLSI) circuits. The technique eliminates the need to manually generate input stimuli for electronically exercising the integrated circuits for stress or life test conditions. The concept is based on utilizing existing test vectors of the Sentry test equipment, manufactured by Fairchild Corp. The flow chart in the figure outlines the technique used in the conversion of the Sentry test vectors into dynamic stress patterns.

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Technique for Generating Dynamic Stress Patterns

A technique is described whereby test vectors are used for testing reliability and operational characteristics and for quickly creating dynamic stress tests for complex very large-scale integrated (VLSI) circuits. The technique eliminates the need to manually generate input stimuli for electronically exercising the integrated circuits for stress or life test conditions. The concept is based on utilizing existing test vectors of the Sentry test equipment, manufactured by Fairchild Corp. The flow chart in the figure outlines the technique used in the conversion of the Sentry test vectors into dynamic stress patterns. The following steps explain the technique used: Step #1 - In order to generate a device description program (DDL) to input file 10, the device input pin functions 11 from the Sentry are defined, as is the register formatting and desired stress groupings. Each group contains eight pins to provide a byte-wide stress pattern. Once the inputs are defined, the DDL file 10 program is generated, using the master software 13 to convert the information into executable statements. Step #3 - Local memory image generation (LMIG) program 14 is used to translate the DDL file for compiling into source code FACTOR 15 (the programming language used by Sentry). Step #3 - After compiling, the program requests the test vectors 16 to designate which local memory input (LMI) files are to be converted. After the program is exe...