Browse Prior Art Database

Time Interlaced Plasma Panel Drive

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000044107D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-05
Document File: 3 page(s) / 43K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Reible, GA: AUTHOR

Abstract

The use of cathode ray tubes (CRTs) as data terminals is universal, and data streams are typically designed to conform or enhance the unique characteristics of the CRT. AC plasma panels can be operated in a CRT mode by employing a time-interlaced data load and erase/write techniques. Specifically, a 30 to 60 Hz raster scan technique is employed wherein data is serialized at high speed by a sweeping electron gun beam which, in turn, excites short persistence phosphors on the CRT face. A continuous image is produced by refreshing the screen on a sequential line basis at 40 to 60 times per second, while the line sweep circuits are reset to the zero position by a 5- to 10-microsecond horizontal retrace pulse. All other real time is used for data transfer.

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Time Interlaced Plasma Panel Drive

The use of cathode ray tubes (CRTs) as data terminals is universal, and data streams are typically designed to conform or enhance the unique characteristics of the CRT. AC plasma panels can be operated in a CRT mode by employing a time-interlaced data load and erase/write techniques. Specifically, a 30 to 60 Hz raster scan technique is employed wherein data is serialized at high speed by a sweeping electron gun beam which, in turn, excites short persistence phosphors on the CRT face. A continuous image is produced by refreshing the screen on a sequential line basis at 40 to 60 times per second, while the line sweep circuits are reset to the zero position by a 5- to 10-microsecond horizontal retrace pulse. All other real time is used for data transfer. AC plasma panels, on the other hand, when used to display data, must be erased and then rewritten on a line by line basis which typically takes from 50 to 200 microseconds, making it impossible to use CRT data streams on a "real" time basis in a conventional plasma display system. The plasma display panel embodiment, herein described, uses an alternate line technique in which adjacent lines are driven from opposite sides of the panel. The proposed technique described in this article overcomes the mismatch between plasma and CRT characteristics by updating the plasma panel on a "non-real" time basis; specifically, by using the alternate line times for the erase and write sequence using plasma drive waveforms with minimum erase and write times and using the following data frame time to fill in these alternate display lines. The waveforms for this operation are illustrated in Fig. 2. The sustain occurs during data load, while the minimized write/erase waveforms use a trailing edge ramp. Thus, by using the first data frame to load the "odd" data lines (1, 3, 5, etc.) with erase/write operations taking place on the "even" data lines (0, 2, 4, etc.), and the second data frame to load the "even data lines with erase/write taking place on the "odd" data lines, and the third data frame to load the "odd" data lines, and so on, a continuously updated image is presented on the plasma display using standard CRT control lines. Wh...