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Reduction of Friction of Thermal Printing

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000044122D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-05
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Dueltgen, RL: AUTHOR

Abstract

Thermally printed ink may have a high coefficient of friction which causes unsatisfactory document feed over the glass of photocopiers and the like. This is eliminated by encapsulating a lubricant, preferably dimethyl siloxane oil of 500 cs viscosity, in microspheres having outer shells which are opened by the heat of printing. These spheres are incorporated in a thin, low melting release layer on the aluminum coating of a support layer. The ink layer is on the opposite side of the release layer. The shell material has a discrete melting point. The shell material preferably is gelatin. Waxes, predominantly polyolefin resins, and polymers, such as ethylene-vinyl acetate co-polymers, are satisfactory. Microcapsules of this kind may be commercially obtained in diameters of 1 to 10 microns.

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Reduction of Friction of Thermal Printing

Thermally printed ink may have a high coefficient of friction which causes unsatisfactory document feed over the glass of photocopiers and the like. This is eliminated by encapsulating a lubricant, preferably dimethyl siloxane oil of 500 cs viscosity, in microspheres having outer shells which are opened by the heat of printing. These spheres are incorporated in a thin, low melting release layer on the aluminum coating of a support layer. The ink layer is on the opposite side of the release layer. The shell material has a discrete melting point. The shell material preferably is gelatin. Waxes, predominantly polyolefin resins, and polymers, such as ethylene-vinyl acetate co-polymers, are satisfactory. Microcapsules of this kind may be commercially obtained in diameters of 1 to 10 microns. Capsules of less than 5 microns in diameter are preferably employed which are obtained by standard mechanical screening techniques. Ribbons of the general type of interest are described in U.S. Patents No. 4,384,797 and 4,320,170. The support is polycarbonate film with a thin aluminum coating toward the ink layer. A 6-micron thick interlayer of low melting, natural or synthetic resin is located between the aluminum and the ink layer. Both the interlayer and the ink layer are applied as dispersions. The spheres have shells of gelatin wax or non-polar resins not attacked by the material of the interlayer dispersion. The spheres are thoroughl...