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Browse Prior Art Database

Process for Forming Copper Studs for Metallurgy Systems

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000044138D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-05
Document File: 2 page(s) / 39K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Schaible, PM: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

This process is for forming a reference and ground plane metallurgy along with interconnecting via studs for multilevel metallurgy of a semiconductor module package. Typically, the reference/ground plane metallurgy is 2-3 microns thick. The via studs associated with the ground plane metallurgy must be approximately 15-20 microns thick in order to extend through the dielectric glass layer. In this process a ceramic substrate 10, typically a multilayer ceramic substrate, has a top surface that has been planarized by grinding and lapping. The reference/ground plane is formed by conventional lift-off process. As illustrated in Fig.

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Process for Forming Copper Studs for Metallurgy Systems

This process is for forming a reference and ground plane metallurgy along with interconnecting via studs for multilevel metallurgy of a semiconductor module package. Typically, the reference/ground plane metallurgy is 2-3 microns thick. The via studs associated with the ground plane metallurgy must be approximately 15-20 microns thick in order to extend through the dielectric glass layer. In this process a ceramic substrate 10, typically a multilayer ceramic substrate, has a top surface that has been planarized by grinding and lapping. The reference/ground plane is formed by conventional lift-off process. As illustrated in Fig. 1, a resist layer 12 is deposited on the surface of substrate 10, the reverse pattern of the desired ground plane formed in the resist by conventional exposing and developing, and blanket layers deposited on the surface. A chromium layer 16, a copper layer 18, and an overlying nickel layer 20 are deposited. As illustrated in Fig. 2, when the resist layer 12 is dissolved, the overlying layer areas of the blanket metallurgy layers are also removed, leaving the reference/ground plane pattern 22. In forming the studs a relatively thick blanket layer 23 of copper and a layer 24 of chromium are deposited on the surface of substrate 10, as shown in Fig. 3. Alternately, layer 24 could be molybdenum. As illustrated in Fig. 4, a resist layer 26 is deposited over the surface of layer 24, the res...