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Improved Utilization of the Image-Receiving Surfaces of TV Cameras for Automatic Image Processing

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000044145D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-05
Document File: 2 page(s) / 43K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Wagner, D: AUTHOR

Abstract

A very simple method is described of using TV cameras for automatic image processing. According to this method, the image information is processed either by multiplying the area of the image-receiving surface and maintaining the resolution, or by suitably increasing the resolution and maintaining the image content. For automatic image processing, the image information is generally stored in a square matrix of 2n x 2n (say, 512 x 512) picture elements (pels). For this purpose, commercially available TV systems, such as those with 625 rows of 833 pels each (both values being nominal ones), are best used, so that there is a rectangular image field 1 which can be optimally adapted to the circular area of the TV camera target 2 (Fig. 1).

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Improved Utilization of the Image-Receiving Surfaces of TV Cameras for Automatic Image Processing

A very simple method is described of using TV cameras for automatic image processing. According to this method, the image information is processed either by multiplying the area of the image-receiving surface and maintaining the resolution, or by suitably increasing the resolution and maintaining the image content. For automatic image processing, the image information is generally stored in a square matrix of 2n x 2n (say, 512 x 512) picture elements (pels). For this purpose, commercially available TV systems, such as those with 625 rows of 833 pels each (both values being nominal ones), are best used, so that there is a rectangular image field 1 which can be optimally adapted to the circular area of the TV camera target 2 (Fig. 1). This means, however, that if commercial TV systems are used for automatic image processing, only a very small part of the image-receiving surface is utilized, since the square matrix with the image information requires only a small part of the surface in the rectangular image field. Generally, in view of the cost and effort involved, it is not worthwhile having a special design for adapting a standard commercial TV system to the requirements of automatic image recording, the image-receiving surface is but insufficiently utilized. This can be remedied by the described method. For square image fields used for automatic image processing, the image-receiving surface is doubled or the resolution is increased by the factor !2, using a commercially available TV camera meeting the above-mentioned geometrical dimensions. The principle may be derived from a comparison of Figs. 1 and 2. The circular target 2 always has the same diameter, but according to Fig. 2, the effective square...