Browse Prior Art Database

Circuit Board Connector Removal and Replacement Tool

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000044166D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-05
Document File: 2 page(s) / 45K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Cherochak, J: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

A circuit board connector removal and replacement tool removes connectors from their associated plated through holes (PTHs) and/or replaces therein individual zero insertion force (ZIF) connectors in situ on the circuit boards. The tool can remove connectors which are connected to signal planes, power planes or ground planes, and/or which are broken off at the solder surface. The tool uses a heating gas to preheat the particular connector and its environs to just below the melting point temperature of the solder. The tool then uses electric resistance heating to melt the solder either to remove the connector from the PTH and/or to bond it thereto, as the case may be. To remove a connector C, preheating hot gas from tube 11 (Fig.

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Circuit Board Connector Removal and Replacement Tool

A circuit board connector removal and replacement tool removes connectors from their associated plated through holes (PTHs) and/or replaces therein individual zero insertion force (ZIF) connectors in situ on the circuit boards. The tool can remove connectors which are connected to signal planes, power planes or ground planes, and/or which are broken off at the solder surface. The tool uses a heating gas to preheat the particular connector and its environs to just below the melting point temperature of the solder. The tool then uses electric resistance heating to melt the solder either to remove the connector from the PTH and/or to bond it thereto, as the case may be. To remove a connector C, preheating hot gas from tube 11 (Fig. 1) concurrently heats solder aspirator or sucker 12 and the bottom of circuit board 13, which is mounted to a stationary fixture (not shown). The solder sucker 12 contacts the bottom land (not shown), surrounding the PTH (Fig. 2) associated with the particular connector and transfers heat to the connector by conduction. The solder sucker 12 is connected to the (-) terminal of the resistance heating supply (RHS) (not shown). Preheating hot gas from another tube 14 heats the paired coacting gripper jaws 15, the top surface of circuit board 13 and the particular connector C. Jaws 15 are electrically connected to the (+) terminal of the RHS. The heating of the gripper jaws 15 prevents them from heat sinking. It also allows jaws 15 to penetrate the solder fillet 17 (Fig. 2) and thus grasp and contact the stop 16 of the connector....