Browse Prior Art Database

Dial-A-Bug

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000044167D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-05
Document File: 2 page(s) / 47K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Ferrer, G: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

This article describes a test tool that permits the user to inject one ground condition at a time on cards under test via two hexadecimal switches under remote control. This eliminates individually putting "bugs" on cards under test because the wiring is done all at once. Dial-A-Bug (DAB) is a test tool that allows the user to inject one ground condition at a time on cards under test. The user can inject up to 256 ground conditions via two hexadecimal switches, one bug at a time. Referring to the drawing, a block diagram of the DAB system is shown. Two hexadecimal switches 1 supply eight lines which are decoded in order to drive sixteen light emitting diodes (LEDs) 2, each one specifying a range of sixteen addresses. For example, addresses 00 to OF have one LED, 10 to 1F have another and up to addresses F0 to FF.

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Dial-A-Bug

This article describes a test tool that permits the user to inject one ground condition at a time on cards under test via two hexadecimal switches under remote control. This eliminates individually putting "bugs" on cards under test because the wiring is done all at once. Dial-A-Bug (DAB) is a test tool that allows the user to inject one ground condition at a time on cards under test. The user can inject up to 256 ground conditions via two hexadecimal switches, one bug at a time. Referring to the drawing, a block diagram of the DAB system is shown. Two hexadecimal switches 1 supply eight lines which are decoded in order to drive sixteen light emitting diodes (LEDs) 2, each one specifying a range of sixteen addresses. For example, addresses 00 to OF have one LED, 10 to 1F have another and up to addresses F0 to FF. The eight lines also are inputs to two hexadecimal displays 3, which optically show the bug number. The 8 lines coming from the hexadecimal switches are decoded to 256 lines via a two-stage cascade decoder 4. The decoder outputs drive tri-state output drivers 5 designed to allow only two different states: ground and float. Only one driver 5 is active at a time (1 of 256). The others are in the float state, thereby being transparent to the card-under-test hardware 6. The card or cards under test reside in the system under test 7. Therefore, only one bug or error condition is injected at a time. The technique can be applied not only to single ca...