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Design of a Low Wear Print Head

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000044172D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-05
Document File: 2 page(s) / 60K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Bayer, RG: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Fig. 1 shows the face of an electrolytic print head. As the head is used, undercut of the electrodes occurs, as illustrated in Fig. 1b. If the wear mechanism which causes the undercut is strictly mechanical, the undercut quickly increases to a steady-state value dependent upon geometry, operating conditions and the relative hardnesses of the electrode and insulator materials. It should be noted that the undercut shown in Fig. 1b assumes the insulator is harder than the electrodes. Fig. 2 depicts a graph of undercut vs. usage for a strictly mechanical wear case. The undercut quickly reaches steady-state. Electrolytic printing experience indicates that an undercut of 100 microinches is tolerable, but that 300 microinches is not. Print quality deteriorates at that figure.

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Design of a Low Wear Print Head

Fig. 1 shows the face of an electrolytic print head. As the head is used, undercut of the electrodes occurs, as illustrated in Fig. 1b. If the wear mechanism which causes the undercut is strictly mechanical, the undercut quickly increases to a steady-state value dependent upon geometry, operating conditions and the relative hardnesses of the electrode and insulator materials. It should be noted that the undercut shown in Fig. 1b assumes the insulator is harder than the electrodes. Fig. 2 depicts a graph of undercut vs. usage for a strictly mechanical wear case. The undercut quickly reaches steady-state. Electrolytic printing experience indicates that an undercut of 100 microinches is tolerable, but that 300 microinches is not. Print quality deteriorates at that figure. If a steady-state undercut of less than 100 microinches can be achieved, print quality will not be degraded. However, the test data is actually as shown in Fig.
3. Undercut quickly progresses to about 50 microinches. From that value on, there is a slow increase to final undercut value that is unacceptable. Selection of a softer material will increase insulator wear and therefore decrease or eliminate the slow increase in undercut. However, too soft an insulator will result in high, overall head wear. It has been determined that this head wear problem can be avoided through judicious selection of conductor and insulator materials of relative hardness and chemical iner...