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Automatic Ultrasonic Developing

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000044182D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-05
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Fritschen, CL: AUTHOR

Abstract

During circuit panel manufacturing a photosensitive emulsion is coated on a screen. The screen is then selectively exposed to ultraviolet light in a predetermined pattern. Exposed emulsion becomes water insoluble, while that not exposed remains water-soluble. Removing the water soluble unexposed emulsion is called developing. This article describes an improved technique for removing water-soluble photoemulsions. Screens are submerged in water at room temperature. The water is first subjected to ultrasonic agitation, then to air agitation. This combination develops the screens consistently with less tension loss than previously experienced using prior-art methods. After the developing step the screens may be dried conventionally.

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Automatic Ultrasonic Developing

During circuit panel manufacturing a photosensitive emulsion is coated on a screen. The screen is then selectively exposed to ultraviolet light in a predetermined pattern. Exposed emulsion becomes water insoluble, while that not exposed remains water-soluble. Removing the water soluble unexposed emulsion is called developing. This article describes an improved technique for removing water-soluble photoemulsions. Screens are submerged in water at room temperature. The water is first subjected to ultrasonic agitation, then to air agitation. This combination develops the screens consistently with less tension loss than previously experienced using prior-art methods. After the developing step the screens may be dried conventionally. This automated process provides the advantages of maintaining tension in the screens, freeing operators for other tasks, while also removing operator dependencies relating to developing times.

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