Browse Prior Art Database

Automated Cooling Air Supply

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000044244D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-05
Document File: 2 page(s) / 91K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Brinkman, WG: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

A system is provided which allows maintenance of air flow at a high degree of accuracy while the control system is operated in a realtime feedback loop integrated with computer program supervision. As shown in Fig. 1, the air supply comprises a motor-driven blower, a pressure gauge and a flowmeter. The fan blower is operable manually or under computer control. It is necessary to measure five distinct pressures in order to accurately calculate and set the air flow. The fan motor speed is controlled in part using a six-step AC inverter drive in conjunction with a computer-controlled butterfly valve mounted on the blower discharge. The AC inverter allows motor speed control from six Hz to 60 Hz. The butterfly valve may be closed or varied to achieve air flows from 0 to 100%.

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Automated Cooling Air Supply

A system is provided which allows maintenance of air flow at a high degree of accuracy while the control system is operated in a realtime feedback loop integrated with computer program supervision. As shown in Fig. 1, the air supply comprises a motor-driven blower, a pressure gauge and a flowmeter. The fan blower is operable manually or under computer control. It is necessary to measure five distinct pressures in order to accurately calculate and set the air flow. The fan motor speed is controlled in part using a six-step AC inverter drive in conjunction with a computer-controlled butterfly valve mounted on the blower discharge. The AC inverter allows motor speed control from six Hz to 60 Hz. The butterfly valve may be closed or varied to achieve air flows from 0 to 100%. Computer programs control both the valve setting and motor speed to give precise air flow from 0 to 500 CFM. The five pressures to be measured are high and low side pressures on 100 and 400 CFM laminar flow meters and the static pressure in the test vehicle box. Using five separate pressure gauges is expensive from a cost and calibration standpoint. Manual toggle valves, represented schematically in Fig. 2, are used in conjunction with computer- controlled solenoid valves to connect the solenoids to only one pressure gauge. To calibrate the system, valves 1 through 6 are closed, valve 7 stays open, and a previously calibrated pressure is applied at fitting 8. The ope...