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Holographic Image Converter for Optical Information Processing

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000044326D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-05
Document File: 2 page(s) / 50K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Sincerbox, GT: AUTHOR

Abstract

A holographic image converter is used with a conventional one- or two- dimensional periodic detector array to respond to light within arbitrarily shaped areas for optical processing. A typical photodetector with sensitive areas having shapes other than one- or two-dimensional rectangular arrays is shown in Fig. 1, where the sensitive surface is divided into subareas, each acting as a separate detector. The detector 10 has an upper area 12 which is divided into wedge-shaped segments and a lower area 14 into concentric zones. A detector 10 of this type would be used in pattern and character recognition systems to characterize the Fourier transform of a character. For example, the wedge zones would sense the angular orientation of a pattern, and the concentric rings would sense the distance from the axis, i.e.

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Holographic Image Converter for Optical Information Processing

A holographic image converter is used with a conventional one- or two- dimensional periodic detector array to respond to light within arbitrarily shaped areas for optical processing. A typical photodetector with sensitive areas having shapes other than one- or two-dimensional rectangular arrays is shown in Fig. 1, where the sensitive surface is divided into subareas, each acting as a separate detector. The detector 10 has an upper area 12 which is divided into wedge- shaped segments and a lower area 14 into concentric zones. A detector 10 of this type would be used in pattern and character recognition systems to characterize the Fourier transform of a character. For example, the wedge zones would sense the angular orientation of a pattern, and the concentric rings would sense the distance from the axis, i.e., spatial frequency. By noting the signal strengths from each segment a unique representation of the character or pattern can be created and used for subsequent recognition. Such a detector configuration, as well as other arbitrary shapes, can be created by using a holographic converter to transform incident light into a pattern corresponding to one- or two-dimensional periodic detector arrays. As shown in Fig. 2, a holograph 18 consists of subareas or mini holograms such as a wedge 20A which is recorded by interference of beam 30 with a reference beam 22A directed towards detector location 24A on...