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Browse Prior Art Database

Beam Contact

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000044338D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-05
Document File: 2 page(s) / 21K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Wagner, WR: AUTHOR

Abstract

This article describes a curved beam contact for use in an electrical connector. The surface curvatures are placed on the interface where both contacts meet. The drawing shows a schematic of the contact. The contacts are fabricated from spring-like members, identified by numerals 10 and 12. A curved surface is fabricated on the surfaces of the contacts. The surfaces touch at the common point of tangency. When used in a data connector, if contact 10 is not coacting with contact 12, then contact 12 touches shorting bars 16 at point 14. When the contact is in communication with the shorting bar, the connector is in a wrap mode and electrical signals do not pass through.

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Beam Contact

This article describes a curved beam contact for use in an electrical connector. The surface curvatures are placed on the interface where both contacts meet. The drawing shows a schematic of the contact. The contacts are fabricated from spring-like members, identified by numerals 10 and 12. A curved surface is fabricated on the surfaces of the contacts. The surfaces touch at the common point of tangency. When used in a data connector, if contact 10 is not coacting with contact 12, then contact 12 touches shorting bars 16 at point 14. When the contact is in communication with the shorting bar, the connector is in a wrap mode and electrical signals do not pass through. Likewise, when the contacts 10 and 12 are coacting with each other, the curved surface on contact 12 is displaced to point 18 and signals are allowed to pass through the connector. By using a curved and tapered member as opposed to a flat surface for forming the contact, the ability of the contact to coact with the shorting bar when its mating contact 10 is not in place is significantly improved. As a result, plastic deformation which is usually associated with contacts having a flat surface therebetween is eliminated.

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