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Browse Prior Art Database

Utilization of High Speed Printer Capabilities in a Word Processing System

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000044342D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-05
Document File: 2 page(s) / 16K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Barnes, JG: AUTHOR [+5]

Abstract

This technique achieves a higher printer throughput and a lower number of diskette accesses in a word processing system by the efficient resolution or integration of headers and footers (margin text) into the final page image of a given document. Such a resolution of headers and footers into a final page image is a two-step process, involving: (1) identifying and obtaining the proper header or footer from the diskette's revisable form internal data stream (RFIDS), and (2) processing the header or footer text using correct format identification and placing it in its proper relationship to body text for easy printing. The prior-art design analyzes the RFIDS data stream and remembers the location on the diskette of each new instance of a specific header or footer to be used on current and subsequent pages.

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Utilization of High Speed Printer Capabilities in a Word Processing System

This technique achieves a higher printer throughput and a lower number of diskette accesses in a word processing system by the efficient resolution or integration of headers and footers (margin text) into the final page image of a given document. Such a resolution of headers and footers into a final page image is a two-step process, involving: (1) identifying and obtaining the proper header or footer from the diskette's revisable form internal data stream (RFIDS), and (2) processing the header or footer text using correct format identification and placing it in its proper relationship to body text for easy printing. The prior-art design analyzes the RFIDS data stream and remembers the location on the diskette of each new instance of a specific header or footer to be used on current and subsequent pages. When the header or footer text is required, a diskette access is performed. For long documents (from 30 to more than 100 pages in length), the diskette directory search time grows linearly with the distance in pages between the current page and the storage location of a specific header or footer. Typically, the header and footer are defined at the head of the document (Page 0), and, when printing large documents in a word processing system/high speed printer link, the operator can notice that the print speed declines for the pages near the end of the document. The new design analyzes the RFIDS data stream and locates all major instances of header or footer to be used, in the following manner: - Primary master format: Page 0 . . . 1 or 2 (alternating) headers or footers - Alternate master format: Page 0 . . . 1 or 2 (alternating) headers or footers - Text unit format change: Top of any page, but only the most recent occurrence applies . . . 1 or 2 (alternating) headers or footers Each of these instances of headers or footers is read from the diskette and saved in memory, immediately upon being located for the first time. Each is tagged as to its origin (see list above), as well as to its original location on the diskette. This is done as a supplement to, and not a replacement of, the original design. The cost in absolute use of bytes is the storage room for the headers and footers plus the executable code to perform this service. The headers and footers are saved in the diskette image -- an RFIDS vector, not yet processed for printing. The prior- art design continues to require that headers and footers be re-read from the diskette, as required, to build print pages. The subroutine employed to interface with the diskette is now altered to check all requests for diskette information against a table of header and footer diskette locations. If a match occurs, then the subroutine reads the header or footer from its memory locations into the diskette interface work buffer. The balance of the print conversion activity processes the header or footer as previously des...