Dismiss
InnovationQ will be updated on Sunday, Oct. 22, from 10am ET - noon. You may experience brief service interruptions during that time.
Browse Prior Art Database

Terminal Crimp Pressure Detector

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000044356D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-05
Document File: 2 page(s) / 40K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Goeller, JE: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Poor electrical crimps between open wire barrel terminals and solid wire in sizes smaller than 30 AWG are very difficult to detect. Normal inspection practice consists of a visual inspection of the crimp, a mechanical measurement of the crimp height, and a pull (tensile) test to verify that the wire breaks at the point of egress, at a specific value for a particular wire size. However, with smaller than 30 AWG wires, the tensile is so low that a pull test is not practical. To overcome this, a method to measure the actual crimping force of the crimp is shown in the figure. By placing strain gauges 1 in an appropriately designed anvil 2, the actual crimp force can be measured for each crimp. A level detector 3 will measure the actual force and compare it with a standard range for a specific terminal 4 and wire 5 size.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 100% of the total text.

Page 1 of 2

Terminal Crimp Pressure Detector

Poor electrical crimps between open wire barrel terminals and solid wire in sizes smaller than 30 AWG are very difficult to detect. Normal inspection practice consists of a visual inspection of the crimp, a mechanical measurement of the crimp height, and a pull (tensile) test to verify that the wire breaks at the point of egress, at a specific value for a particular wire size. However, with smaller than 30 AWG wires, the tensile is so low that a pull test is not practical. To overcome this, a method to measure the actual crimping force of the crimp is shown in the figure. By placing strain gauges 1 in an appropriately designed anvil 2, the actual crimp force can be measured for each crimp. A level detector 3 will measure the actual force and compare it with a standard range for a specific terminal 4 and wire 5 size. Any reading outside of the normal range, either higher or lower, will cause a failure and prevent the crimping press from cycling until the operator takes corrective action and then resets the electronic box. This type of actual measurement of the crimp force, for each crimp, will show the most common problems that cause poor (high resistance) crimps, such as: . trapped insulation in the wire barrel, . insufficient conductor in the wire barrel, . improper setting of the crimp height (too high or too low), and . foreign material in the wire barrel.

1

Page 2 of 2

2

[This page contains 3 pictures or other non-text objects...