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Optical Determination of Crystal Axis Orientation in Silicon Fragments or Devices

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000044371D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-05
Document File: 2 page(s) / 30K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Gajda, JJ: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

In this method the axis orientation of a monocrystalline silicon object is determined by measuring the intensity of the 1-phonon band at 523 cm in the Raman effect, using polarized incident radiation. In a device or silicon fragment where the alignment of the (110) axis is unknown, X-ray diffraction is normally used to determine the alignment. This is a slow method, requiring a trained specialist to make measurements. Referring now to the figure, there is shown a schematic illustration of the apparatus used to make the optical determination. The sample to be analyzed is placed on microscope stage 10, supported on an x-y translating table 13, and the area of interest is positioned with white light illumination obtained from source 12.

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Optical Determination of Crystal Axis Orientation in Silicon Fragments or Devices

In this method the axis orientation of a monocrystalline silicon object is determined by measuring the intensity of the 1-phonon band at 523 cm in the Raman effect, using polarized incident radiation. In a device or silicon fragment where the alignment of the (110) axis is unknown, X-ray diffraction is normally used to determine the alignment. This is a slow method, requiring a trained specialist to make measurements. Referring now to the figure, there is shown a schematic illustration of the apparatus used to make the optical determination. The sample to be analyzed is placed on microscope stage 10, supported on an x-y translating table 13, and the area of interest is positioned with white light illumination obtained from source 12. For the measurement a laser spot is used to illuminate this sample and the Raman scattered light is collected by the objective lens 14 and is passed by beam splitter 16. Mirrors 18 and 20 are interlocked in such a way as to permit white light illumination and occular observation through lens 22 in one position to protect the photomultiplier 24; and in a second position while serving to allow laser illumination and detector observation which serves to prevent hazardous high intensity at the occular lens
22. A narrow bandpass filter 26 passes laser green light and rejects the interfering argon emission lines. A second narrow bandpass filter, which corresp...