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Wound Multi-Matrix Technology Print Head

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000044387D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-05
Document File: 2 page(s) / 32K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Carden, GR: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

A print head, particularly suitable for use in an electrolytic printer, is fabricated by winding a coil onto a square mandrel. Depending upon diameter and center-to-center spacing, this assembly could be used to form a two- or four- channel print head. Each side of the mandrel becomes one channel of the print head. Length is no object in forming a head using this method, since standard 8" or 11" head configurations could be done on a lathe set-up. A print head was made using a lathe and setting automatic feed rate to a pitch of .008" per revolution. This places the winding, which is being fed onto the mandrel, on .008" centers. Insulated and relatively inexpensive copper wire #34 gauge was used on an experimental basis. Platinum would probably be the best choice for commercial print head implementation.

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Wound Multi-Matrix Technology Print Head

A print head, particularly suitable for use in an electrolytic printer, is fabricated by winding a coil onto a square mandrel. Depending upon diameter and center- to-center spacing, this assembly could be used to form a two- or four- channel print head. Each side of the mandrel becomes one channel of the print head. Length is no object in forming a head using this method, since standard 8" or 11" head configurations could be done on a lathe set-up. A print head was made using a lathe and setting automatic feed rate to a pitch of .008" per revolution. This places the winding, which is being fed onto the mandrel, on .008" centers. Insulated and relatively inexpensive copper wire #34 gauge was used on an experimental basis. Platinum would probably be the best choice for commercial print head implementation. An epoxy glass laminate was first placed over locating pins on the mandrel. Laminate 1 could also have a solid ground material bonded on one side of it and be .002" to .003" thick, thereby insulating the winding from the ground by the required cathode-to-anode distance. Laminate 2 is bonded with epoxy after the coil is wound. All glass epoxy laminates could be used in the uncured state. They could be wound over, then pressed and cured in an oven, which would bond the wires in place when the epoxy-impregnated glass cloth reflows. With this technique, the solid ground would also be bonded all in one operation. The locating pins are...