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Ease-Of-Use Feature - START Button

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000044401D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-05
Document File: 2 page(s) / 29K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

McMahon, RF: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

A "START" button is a key added as an ease-of-use feature to data base terminals for use by the general populace. Because the average user would be an individual inexperienced in the use of terminals, ease-of- use features are important. One such feature is to provide a distinctive "START" button which will, when depressed, bring up a menu on the display. This menu is preloaded (in non-volatile random-access memory) during terminal installation and is a list of the systems or services that may be accessed by this terminal. The items on the menu will be identified numerically or alphabetically. An alternative implementation using a touch sensitive screen would allow selection by touch-rather than selection using the A/N keyboard. The figure shows a typical layout of the menu.

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Ease-Of-Use Feature - START Button

A "START" button is a key added as an ease-of-use feature to data base terminals for use by the general populace. Because the average user would be an individual inexperienced in the use of terminals, ease-of- use features are important. One such feature is to provide a distinctive "START" button which will, when depressed, bring up a menu on the display. This menu is preloaded (in non-volatile random-access memory) during terminal installation and is a list of the systems or services that may be accessed by this terminal. The items on the menu will be identified numerically or alphabetically. An alternative implementation using a touch sensitive screen would allow selection by touch- rather than selection using the A/N keyboard. The figure shows a typical layout of the menu. Typically, the terminal may have a screen format of 24 lines of 40 characters. If the menu were to exceed 24 choices, then the last line of the first menu would contain a message that reads "PUSH START for continuation of MENU." Now that the user has viewed the menu, a selection is the next step. By pressing the appropriate A/N key (or by touching the appropriate item on a touch- sensitive screen), an auto-log-on procedure to the selected service is begun. Typically, this consists of several parts. First, an auto dialer will call the appropriate system. The system will answer and return an inquiry signal (e.g., ENQ). This action by the system is essentially...