Browse Prior Art Database

Automated Keyboard Reclamation Process

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000044435D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-05
Document File: 2 page(s) / 70K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Miller, JR: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Keyboards consisting of multiple switches assembled to an electronic circuit card or base plate are tested upon completion of the assembly operation. Defects or electrical faults are uncovered at this time, and, traditionally, such keyboards have been disassembled with the good parts returned to inventory. A rework machine and process are disclosed which enable controlled partial disassembly of the entire keyboard to occur without removing the multiple components. This permits electrically faulty or defective elements to be replaced individually without disrupting the entire assembly and returning parts to inventory. A great advantage in savings of invested time and productivity effort as well as reduced time in rework are the result of this process. Fig.

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Automated Keyboard Reclamation Process

Keyboards consisting of multiple switches assembled to an electronic circuit card or base plate are tested upon completion of the assembly operation. Defects or electrical faults are uncovered at this time, and, traditionally, such keyboards have been disassembled with the good parts returned to inventory. A rework machine and process are disclosed which enable controlled partial disassembly of the entire keyboard to occur without removing the multiple components. This permits electrically faulty or defective elements to be replaced individually without disrupting the entire assembly and returning parts to inventory. A great advantage in savings of invested time and productivity effort as well as reduced time in rework are the result of this process. Fig. 1A illustrates in cross section a keyboard assembly in an inverted position. The keyboard electronics 1 is housed within a housing 2 having a removable bottom cover. Individual key buttons 3 are mounted on a plurality of key actuator members shown only as stems 6. Fig. 1B illustrates in detail an inverted, assembled key 3. The base of the keyboard 2 retains the keyboard electronic circuit card 1. The key caps 3 mounted on key stem 6 are slidably supported by an actuator spring 5, as shown. An electrical actuating member 4 within the keyboard housing would be released if the base cover 2 and circuit board 1 are removed. This would necessitate a laborious and time consuming reassembly or return of the parts to stock for reuse at a later time. The dimension Y is maintained in the assembled keyboard but can be increased, maintaining alignment between the keybutton 3 and the key stem or housing 6; however, the key top 3 wou...